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*Archaeology News*
*Metal Detecting News*
*Treasure Hunting News*

This website is brought to you by a team of very passionate historians and metal detectorists. We are not part of the grab it and run brigade.
History is extremely important to us and recording finds and working alongside archaeologists is of utmost importance.

Monday, 25 August 2014

Row over bones discovery

THE search which discovered bones in a Roman copper mine on the Powys border may have been done illegally.

Human bones were discovered last week in the old mine at Llanymynech Caves as a result of metal detector activity.

The bones are currently being investigated by Dyfed-Powys Police forensic experts.

Now a top regional archaeologist is claiming that it was illegal to use metal detectors on the site during the discovery.

Chris Martin, head of curatorial services at Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust, says that the site is labelled a ‘scheduled ancient monument site’ by the Welsh Government's historic environment service (Cadw) meaning no metal detecting should have taken place or digging done without permission.

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Saturday, 31 May 2014

Riddlesden metal detectorist finds second precious Tudor artefact

A Keighley charity fundraiser who only took up metal detecting as a hobby late last year has discovered another precious historical artefact.

Riddlesden resident, Stephen Auker, who recently found dozens of ancient silver Roman coins at a site in his own neighbourhood, has now uncovered a 16th-century Tudor ring.

His latest find, this time in a field in Silsden where he had permission to carry out detecting, has been declared treasure trove.

“I was searching in this field for about five hours and I was about to go back to the car, disappointed, when I found it,” he said.

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Sunday, 25 May 2014

Expert in his field, treasure hunter who struck gold

In a rain-lashed field in deepest Dorset, treasure-hunter David Spohr yesterday moved to a familiar refrain: squelch… splosh… ping! The big hope is that the “ping” will be Mr Spohr’s metal detector homing in on something ancient and precious hidden beneath the soil.

Unfortunately, like most treasure-hunters, he spends a lot of time digging up old nails and rusty beer cans. But last month, the 55-year-old hit the jackpot. On a routine foray into the Tarrant Valley, he found a 3,500-year-old gold lunula – a chest ornament worn by a Bronze Age chieftain – 10in below ground.

The rare, near-perfect piece is currently being assessed by experts, but is thought to be worth around £20,000, and is likely to go to the British Museum.

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Tuesday, 29 April 2014

Inquests find medieval and Bronze Age relics found by metal detectors in West Norfolk are treasure

The coins were found by Stephen Sproule whilst he was metal detecting on land at Fincham, near Downham Market, in October 2011.

Coroner Jacqueline Lake said the small silver coins were known as Sceattas and represented the first type of penny, which were minted from 675AD until the middle of the 8th Century.

“They were scattered over a wide area but would appear to represent a hoard or part of a hoard, rather than stray losses over time” she said.

“These coins are in good condition and had not been in circulation long when deposited.”

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Saturday, 19 April 2014

Girl, 7, digs up 'WW2 bomb' on Norfolk beach

A suspected World War Two phosphorus bomb dug up by a seven-year-old girl on a Norfolk beach burst into flames when her mother prodded it with a fork.

May Archibald-Green, from Berkshire, was on holiday with her family when she found the device with her metal detector on Holkham beach on Thursday.

She said it "looked like a rock", and began to spark when her mother Judi Green prodded it with a garden fork.

Ms Green said police told her it sounded like a wartime phosphorus bomb.

The area has cordoned off and an Army bomb disposal unit is expected to make sure the device safe later.

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Thursday, 17 April 2014

Wealthy landowner’s gold mourning ring found in south Norfolk by metal sleuth

A ring belonging to a wealthy 16th- century Londoner and former Sheriff of Norfolk, who owned the land where Buckingham Palace now stands, has been found in a south Norfolk field.

The discovery of the 7g, 24 carat gold mourning ring, belonging to Hugh Audley, was made by John Reed, of Tibenham, while out with his metal detector in December.

It was recorded as treasure trove by coroner Jacqueline Lake at an inquest in Norwich yesterday.

Mr Reed, who only started metal detecting last summer, said the clear inscriptions on the ring made it easy to research its history.

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Sunday, 13 April 2014

Suffolk Bronze Age axe and ring hoard 'undervalued'

A man who found a Bronze Age axe and four gold rings in Suffolk is disappointed with their £550 valuation.

Steven Walker discovered them in a field near Lowestoft in 2011 and estimated they were worth about £6,200.

He said the official valuation process was flawed and it would not encourage people to hand in treasure rather than sell it on the black market.

The government's Treasure Valuation Committee (TVC) said £550 was a fair price based on independent advice.

The 'Near North Cove Hoard' featured a hollow axe head containing three whole 'lock rings' and two fragments of what was believed to be a broken fourth ring.

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