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Friday, 6 July 2012

Can you scrap English Copper Coins?


In recent years the bronze pennies and twopences of Elizabeth II have become more valuable as scrap, than the value attributed to it by the Royal Mint. However


However not everybody is aware that in the Coinage Act 1971, it is strictly prohibited to melt down or break up any metal coin which is for the time being current in the United Kingdom or which, having been current there, has at any time after 16th May 1969 ceased to be so.


The penalty is




Any person who contravenes subsection (1) of this section shall be liable—
(a)on summary conviction, to a fine not exceeding £400;


(b)on conviction on indictment, to a fine or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or both.



10   Restrictions on melting or breaking of metal coins.


(1)No person shall, except under the authority of a licence granted by the Treasury, melt down or break up any metal coin which is for the time being current in the United Kingdom or which, having been current there, has at any time after 16th May 1969 ceased to be so. 


(2)Any person who contravenes subsection (1) of this section shall be liable— 


(a)on summary conviction, to a fine not exceeding £400; 


(b)on conviction on indictment, to a fine or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or both. 


(3)If any condition attached to a licence granted under subsection (1) of this section is contravened or not complied with, the person to whom the licence was granted shall be liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding [F18level 5 on the standard scale]unless he proves that the contravention or non-compliance occurred without his consent or connivance and that he exercised all due diligence to prevent it. 


(4)The court by or before which any person is convicted of an offence under this section may, whether or not it imposes any other punishment, order the articles in respect of which the offence was committed to be forfeited to Her Majesty. 


(5)Where an offence under this section committed by a body corporate is proved to have been committed with the consent or connivance of, or to be attributable to any neglect on the part of, any director, manager, secretary or other similar officer of the body corporate or any person who was purporting to act in any such capacity, he as well as the body corporate shall be guilty of that offence and shall be liable to be proceeded against and punished accordingly.





So next time you are tempted it might be worth bearing this in mind.

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